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Technology and Executive Education by Martin Doherty — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
A report on some of the discussions of the Executive Learning Workgroup. Compiled by Martin Doherty (Ultralab) and Alan Matcham (Oracle): Published by Oracle July 2006. First point of contact for more information: Email: Martin@ultralab.net
Ultraversity Research findings by Graham Hart — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
Ultraversity is the name by which we know our BA (Hons) Learning Technology and Research, a fully on line undergraduate degree. The Ultraversity Research project in broad terms examines the issues and experiences and pedagogical environment in which the degree operates. The dissemination of this knowledge may be found on the Ultraversity Research blog at
Some Perspectives on Establishing Online Learning Communitie by Graham Hart — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
Adoptions of computer managed learning environments continue to increase, both inside the formal educational domain and in the commercial training environment. The perceived business case and its seductive message of greater efficiency are persuading senior figures in educational establishments to adopt the web as a delivery mechanism. The essentially hierarchical nature of educational management means that key decisions, which have major implications for student and academic staff alike, are imposed often without adequate stakeholder representation. This paper published in 2001 looked at the rapid advance of educational theory from a College Instructional paradigm (Barr, 1994) to the Learning Paradigm and the early work of Laurillard (1993) on effective use of Educational Technology. It looked at models of online course design concerned with building and running effective learning communities Hart (2000), and looked at work by Salmon (2000), Heppell & Ramondt (1998) in the UK, and by Kim (2000) in the US. It reported on the lessons of Talking Heads, a private, interactive community area of NCSL Online, which has several thousand active members, all of whom are head teachers. It reported on experience with students accessing from a commercial environment. (Please note that the conversion, by others, of this file to a PDF has truncated some of the text in the diagram, which was originally dynamic.)
Millwood and Terrell - Overview - New technology, learning and assessment in higher education by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
This overview paper considers some of the directions that the use of ICT in higher education (HE) have taken, and might continue to take. There are opportunities and choices to be made and these focus on the following issues—access, engagement, community, pedagogy and cost.
Chapman, Ramondt and Smiley - Strong community, deep learning: exploring the link by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
This paper explores the constructivist understanding that shared practitioner research in collaborative online spaces leads to deeper learning.
Bradshaw, Powell and Terrell - Developing engagement in Ultralab’s online communities of enquiry by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
This paper provides an account of the development of online communities at Ultralab for students engaged on masters-level programmes, doctoral research and continuing professional learning. It considers the ways in which the engagement of learners, and their consequent participation, is seen to be dependent on several factors—the learners’ perception of purpose, their sense of identity and trust, framing of learning activities, interventions from learning facilitators and tutors, and the information architecture of the learning space.
Revill, Terrell, Powell and Tindal - Learning in the workplace: a new degree online by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
In 2003, a new degree, the BA (Hons) in Learning, Technology and Research, was launched by Ultralab. Challenged by the objective to create a new degree for people in full-time work, the Ultralab team focused on designing a programme that maximises opportunities for learning in the workplace.
Allen - Online learning: constructivism and conversation as an approach to learning by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
This article looks at some of the ways in which the design and practices of Talk 2 Learn, an online community, may reflect the thinking of Wenger and Vygotsky. It also begins to explore through the Talk 2 Learn example why it can be a useful addition to the traditional UK higher education models of learning.
Ham and Davey - Our first time: two higher education tutors reflect on becoming a ‘virtual teacher’ by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
This paper reports some action research we conducted on our own initial experiences of incorporating ‘online’ elements into our respective teacher education courses. They have been experiences which have seen us confront issues which go well beyond technical questions of how to teach in a virtual environment, to encompass more value-laden self-enquiries about why we should, and the relationship, if there is to be one, between virtual teaching and virtuous teaching.
McGuire - Assessment using new technology by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
This paper will discuss an innovative project, eVIVA, which uses mobile phones and the Internet to support formative assessment. The eVIVA project is currently being piloted by Ultralab, a learning and technology research unit at Anglia Polytechnic University, in schools across the UK.
Hart - Some insights into choosing a Platform for a Virtual Learning Environment by Graham Hart — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
This report takes a introductory look at on the trend toward more Internet enabled course delivery, with particular reference to the Higher Education market. It considers some common teaching and learning paradigms and some of the theory of Constructivist Learning and relates this to learning that is facilitated by Internet delivery within the context of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). A VLE is considered as one specialised tool itself may or may not be part of a Managed Learning Environment (MLE). The report identifies some of the strengths and limitations of the VLE and MLE delivery platforms; it also looks at some student responses to on-line learning and the delivery systems. The report’s key conclusions are that:- 1. There is no one “best” VLE/MLE platform. 2. Successful introduction of VLEs requires careful institutional change management, on-going staff training. The report recommends that any institution considering introduction of a V/MLE should establish a project team to manage the process. Such a team should have the mandate of and report directly to the Vice-Chancellor or equivalent officer.
IETI Vol 42, No 3, August 2005 by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
A special issue of this journal, Innovations in Education and Teaching International, focussing on Ultralab projects.
Hillier, Mitchell and Millwood - ‘Change of heart!’: a new e-learning model geared to addressing complex and sensitive public health issues by Richard Millwood — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
Helping the individual learner to identify and work collaboratively with the salient issues is difficult, especially in the classroom where issues may be too personally experienced. A dynamic, interactive e-learning environment, on the other hand, offers more scope for exploring issues at a safe distance, while promoting individual and group enquiry and the formation of intellectual relationships. However, it is argued here that a new approach to e-learning is needed, to afford the kinds of experiences necessary for learning about complex and sensitive issues.
Russell - An Analysis of a Successful Online Community Within Talking Heads by Mark Constable — last modified Friday Oct 6, 2006 11:57
With the CHEPS (Centre for Higher Education Policy Study) reporting that internationally change within institutions of higher education is slow this paper highlights two radical innovations and their use of community software in the learning process. It presents a case study of an online, short-life successful community within one of those innovations, the NCSL. It shows how a group of headteachers from a wide geography and all sectors came together in an online community to support and learn from each other. It attempts to answer key questions about the success of that community and suggests learning for target groups can move away from the existing core medium in Higher Education, the lecture.
Mitchell, A, Millwood, R, Fallenboeck, M. (2006) Towards a pedagogical framework for the mobile Game-Based Learning project - key considerations. ICL2006, International Conference ICL, Villach, Austria by Alice Mitchell — last modified Tuesday Oct 31, 2006 22:40
A growing body of research indicates that mobile technologies can be effective tools in catering for students in a digital age and there are signs of the motivating potential and possible learning gains of games played on mobile devices with young adult audiences. The 3-year EC-funded project mobile Game-based Learning (mGBL) therefore seeks todesign new learning models based on mobile games. These will be standards-based for use in blended learning programmes. Specifically we aim to support development of decision-making skills and strategies for crisis situations – a priority concern of the European Community. Our vision is for great games that can effectively engage youngpeople and that exemplify best practice – but what exactly is this in the new field? Thispaper considers a pedagogical framework for mGBL that also addresses emerging ethical and legal issues.
Mitchell A, Inchingolo P, Vatta F, Cisic D, Peric A, Ipsic I, Taksic V, Gricar J, Petrovic O, Kittl C, Peyha H-J (2006) Designing Mobile Games to Promote Decision-making Skills - a pan-European project by Alice Mitchell — last modified Tuesday Oct 31, 2006 22:44
Paper published in the proceedings of MIPRO 2006, Rijeka, Croatian Society for Information and Communication Technology, Electronics and Microelectronics, pages 124-128 ISBN 953-233-022-4 Abstract: Research shows the potential of mobile games to promote learning in young adults. The 3-year EC-funded project mGBL (mobile Game-based Learning) will prototype a platform and tools for the cost- and time-efficient development and deployment of mobile learning games. At least two types of game template will be designed. These will be for strategy games that can support the development of decisionmaking skills for crisis situations. Example games will be developed in the fields of e-health, e-commerce and career guidance. This short paper outlines project development stages and identifies issues emerging during the exploratory phase of the design process.
Mitchell A, Cisic D (2006) Using mobile game-based technologies to engage young adults in lifelong learning by Alice Mitchell — last modified Tuesday Oct 31, 2006 22:49
Paper published in the proceedings of MIPRO 2006, Rijeka, Croatian Society for Information and Communication Technology, Electronics and Microelectronics, pages 133-136 ISBN 953-233-022-4. Abstract: Tough challenges face Higher Education in a knowledge-based, net-centric economy as we gear up to meet the pressures of global competition. New perspectives are needed in catering for the needs and interests of learners who have grown up in a digital age. Increasingly schools, colleges and universities are harnessing mobile technologies and the Internet to support learning. At the same time research findings indicate the motivating potential and possible learning gains of games played on mobile devices with young adult audiences. Arguably therefore the ‘mobile learning’ approach (m-learning) needs to be extended to include use of mobile learning games. The 3-year EC-funded project mG-BL (mobile Game-based Learning) is a practical response to that need.
Mitchell A (2006) Classifying mobile games and their applicability to different learning situations and target audiences by Alice Mitchell — last modified Tuesday Oct 31, 2006 22:53
Paper published in the proceedings of Mobile Learning 2006, Dublin, Ireland, IADIS Press, pages 384-389 ISBN: 972-8924-15-1. Abstract: Research shows the potential of computer games, including mobile games, to promote learning in young adults. The 3-year EC-supported project mobile Game-Based Learning (mG-BL) will prototype a platform for the cost- and time-efficient development and deployment of mobile learning games. These will be strategy games that can support young adults in developing decision-making skills for crisis situations. At least two types of game model will be designed.Example implementations will be in the fields of e-health, e-commerce and career guidance. This short paper outlines the theory-based development of a Classification of mobile games that has been an important first step in the mG-BL gamesdesign process and highlights emerging findings of underpinning field research.

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